Paintings at the Pastry Peddler

Today’s blog will be a brief one, but an important one (to me at least).

Photo 2017-08-03, 7 01 17 PM.jpgAs I’ve mentioned in the past, I’ve always thought that I’d go to post secondary school for art and become a children’s book illustrator when I was… well the age I am now. Instead, I chose a different route, but I tried to promise myself that art would be an ongoing hobby or possibly more if I tried hard enough.

After my teenage years, I practised art a little less – this made me lose some of my artistic confidence. At the age of 26, I have now regained the confidence that I once had as a 17-year-old aspiring illustrator and have been putting myself out there art-wise. What does that mean? Before landing my marketing job, I had been taking a number of custom illustration commissions! I loved being creative again and pushing myself by trying new techniques. Then I contacted a shop about displaying my work.

Photo 2017-08-03, 6 59 34 PM.jpgThe town of Millbrook has a delightful café called the Pastry Peddler with a unique Bike shop on the second floor. I’ve often admired the building for it’s beautiful interior architectural structures like the gorgeous old staircase at the back of the building that leads up to Frog Cycles. The hallway from the café section to the washrooms, as well as the back staircase, features different artists each month and this month I’m lucky enough to be displaying a collection of my own work!

I created a handful (maybe a little too many) of hanging layouts ahead of time and am happy with my final choice. I’m proud of myself for this small accomplishment, we should allow ourselves some personal pride on occasion. It’s not an art gallery show, but I’m putting my art in front of the public-eye – putting a part of myself on display to be judged. Art is personal and I know mine won’t be for everyone, but if it makes one person stop to take a double look (one that doesn’t read as “ew, gross”), I’ll be a happy girl!

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Experiencing Mystical Landscapes in a City Centre

(I did not take photos of the paintings and the ones I am using do not do the colours or texture of the real things justice – this exhibition is a must see)

cropThis past Tuesday, Chris and I had afternoon plans in Toronto so we decided to make a bit of a day out of it. We live approximately an hour away from the city and don’t go downtown very often. I am someone who really loves her hometown and usually visits small town antique stores rather than busy city boutiques – this only makes my treks to Toronto all the more special.

Since late October, the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) has been hosting an exhibit called Mystical Landscapes: Masterpieces from Monet, Van Gogh and more. I hadn’t been to the gallery in over five years and was so excited to see the temporary collection, I was also thrilled to be going with Chris who had never gone before. We caught a train into the city just before 10:00 am and did a crossword together for the majority of the ride.

Fun Fact: I love crosswords and keep a pen in my purse just in case I happen upon one.

When we arrived at Union Station, we went upstairs to the Pilot Coffee stand where Chris bought me a hot chocolate (a child at heart) and a coffee for himself. We took our warm drinks and headed to the subway to save time. We rode the University line to St. Patrick and walked the short distance to the AGO.

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Chris and I pre-Mystical experience.

After getting our tickets and checking our coats, we climbed the stairs to the Mystical Landscape exhibition. We chose not to opt-in for audio headsets; although the audio files are educational, I find that they can take away from the viewing experience. Instead, Chris and I moved to the paintings at our own pace, viewed them in our own order, shared discussions, and read the descriptions of pieces that we liked.

The spaces were dim with picture perfect gallery lights that highlighted the masterpieces that were hung on the wall. It was incredible. The rooms were packed with art lovers, listening to their audio sets, and taking in the different forms of expression. I was so excited to see pieces that I had once studied in art history books displayed right in front of me. As soon as

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Vision of the Sermon (1888) – Paul Gaugin

we walked in, I saw Paul Gaugin’s Vision of the Sermon (1888) to our left and couldn’t wait to see more. The first room really started the collection off with a bang, there were famous paintings that I recognized every few feet. Claude Monet pieces were outstanding, I hadn’t imagined them to be so large! as a fan of impressionism, I couldn’t get enough of the colourful shading in person, you could really see the flecks of warm colours mixing with the blues and purples to represent

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Haystack, Sunset (1891) – Claude Monet

shadows – no use of black. Two of Monet’s haystack paintings were there and were a favourite of mine, but they also had some water lilies and two of the Rouen Cathedral series (allowing us to see his practise of painting the same building at various times of the day for light and colour study).

One section featured four or five different artists that depicted scenes from World War I (WWI) – Chris deemed this the Battlefield 1 display. My favourite WWI themed painting was Frederick Varley’s Gas Chamber at Seaford (1918) and Chris’ was Felix Vallotton’s Verdun (1917). It’s always fascinating to see artists’ drastically diverse interpretations, as well as how subjective viewer’s tastes are. I really enjoyed seeing which pieces Chris liked and thought about how great it would be to study a person’s psychology based on artistic preferences. If this already exists, please lead me to a link for further reading!

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Left: Gas Chamber at Seaford (1918) – Frederick Varley | Right:Verdun (1917) – Felix Vallotton

Without a doubt, the most anticipated and most enjoyable painting to see was Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night over the Rhone at Arles (1888). It was incredible to stand mere feet away from the colourful textured strokes

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Starry Night over the Rhone at Arles (1888) – Vincent Van Gogh

that are much more beautiful in person than they are in any art history textbooks. I pointed to the man and woman in the bottom right corner and told Chris that they were us and we should paint our dog Summit in. We made sure that we really allowed ourselves to take the piece in because it’s quite likely that we’ll never get to see it in person again.

If you are in or near Toronto before February 12, 2017 (the last day of the exhibition), I strongly encourage you to see Mystical Landscapes. You will not be disappointed, it was truly exceptional.

Other favourites (see below) between Chris and I were: Henri Sidaner’s Moonlight, Bruges (1900); Eugene Jansson’s Dawn over Riddarfjärden (1899), Edvard Munch’s The Sun (1909); Lawren Harris’ Decorative Landscape (1917); and Georgia O’Keeffe’s Red Hills, Lake George (1927).

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Moonlight, Bruges (1900) – Henri Sidaner
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Dawn over Riddarfjaren (1899) – Eugene Jansson
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The Sun (1909) – Edvard Munch
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Decorative Landscape (1917) – Lawren Harris
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Red Hills, Lake George (1927) – Georgia O’Keefe

Plein Air Painting Festival Freezes and Pleases

(Thanks to my mom, Sandy Goulding, for taking all of the photos featuring the festival in this entry, but mainly for hanging out with me all day and holding an umbrella over my canvas multiple times)

I was visiting my mom in Millbrook, Ontario a few weeks ago when I randomly leafed through her town’s paper and discovered an advertisement for the Cavan Painting Festival being held during Culture Days. I had just made the extended deadline to register for only $25 and figured it could be a lot of fun and a great way to get back into art now that I have more free time.

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One of my best friends Hanna standing with me at a college art show at the Station Gallery in front of a portrait I painted of her.

You see, at age 11 I had decided to be an illustrator and that I would attend Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario. At age 17, right out of high school, I shocked myself by actually getting accepted into their competitive illustration program. The timing wasn’t right for me and I declined the offer (something that I hoped wouldn’t be a mistake), but not before my parents bought me a school sweater that I still wear even though I never ended up going.

 

One year later my parents thought it would be a good idea for me to keep practicing my art and so I took a one-year certificate Foundations in Art and Design program at Durham College. I met a lot of really great people that I am still connected with and it rekindled my love for figure drawing. I graduated in the top three spots of my class and waited two years before deciding to go to university to study Communications.

Fresh out of a four-year UOIT degree, I am up to my eyes in job applications. I decided that one of the best ways to keep a level head about temporary unemployment is to not only start this blog, but to put more effort into my long lost love of visual arts.

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My hand embroidered image of the Robert McLaughlin Gallery.

This past summer I tried my hand at embroidery and was busy with artistic DIY creations for the wedding, but now I have time to paint.

The Cavan Painting Festival was a welcome distraction from my dog’s passing midweek. I gathered my supplies and busied myself with preparations for the event. It was a Plein Air festival which means that we were to paint outdoors, facing the changing weather conditions, altered sunlight, and moving objects within our views. As the weekend approached, the weather didn’t look promising which made me more nervous than I already was.

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None the less, my wonderful mother stayed by my side the entire Saturday. I registered my blank canvases with the hosting gallery owner Valerie of the Cavan Art Academy at approximately 8:30am. My mom and I took my Suburu Forester to a spot that I’d scouted out during a Friday afternoon drive.

It was a beautiful misty morning which made for a nice division of background, middleground, and foreground. Mist might be pretty, but it also means that the weather is damp and cold – which means so were we. We opened the trunk door of the Forester, fixed a tarp to it and make-shift-weighted it down with a half full oil container and my mom’s chair. It was clearly a sound structure.

My first painting was done with acrylics on an 8×10 canvas in about two and a half hours. My body was warm enough, but my fingers were exposed for this entire period and were stiff as they gripped the paint brushes. The truly wonderful thing about small-town communities is the friendly vibe that exists on every street. I was parked on a one sided, no exit, street facing the land that gets used as the fairground in the spring. Each resident of the six houses came out to see what I was doing, to offer us tea and coffee, and one lady offered me the use of her bathroom. We welcomed the offer of tea and coffee, as well as a quick bathroom break that was needed after drinking a lot of tea! Millbrook residents remind me that some people are pretty amazing.

I titled this first piece Ruby’s Fairground, naming it after a beautiful and gentle red-golden retriever that I’d met before I had started painting. I fell in love with her and then near the end of my piece she was running in the field around the barns so I painted her in.

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Photo of “Ruby’s Fairground” by Cassy Goulding.

Mom and I packed up and took a warm lunch break at Madison’s Place downtown. An obvious regular and troublemaker was complaining loudly that they didn’t serve breakfast all day. After making a drawn out scene about it all to the waitresses and owner for several minutes he asked “what am I supposed to eat?!” I spoke up and declared “lunch!” The waitresses laughed and cheered for me, but the man looked less than impressed.

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Prepping to start my second painting.

After lunch I decided on my next location, the corner of the current road detour due to road construction at the foot of their main street. This gave me a view of the post office, the back of the old city hall, and a partial glimpse of what was once the fire hall.

Millbrook is known for two obvious things, the local mill, and the brook on which it sits – I didn’t want to paint either of these things in order to try to stand out among 64 other artists competing. That’s right, 65 artists came out in the rainy weather to compete for the impressive grand prize of $1500.00, the 2nd prize of $1000.00, and the 3rd prize of $500.00 all sponsored by Galerie Q. Some people came all the way from British Columbia and Alberta!

The afternoon allowed for the weather to warm up a little and my fingers to be a less stiff. I painted on a larger 20×20 canvas in acrylics, this piece took me approximately four and a half hours to complete. As I was finishing the painting, large drops of rain splashed my canvas as my mother quickly tried to get an umbrella up (she was still with me, what mom-dedication eh?). I wrapped up, packed up, and headed to her house for the night. Boy was I tired and in pain, but I was proud of what I had painted.

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Photo of “Detour 1” by Cassy Goulding.

Sunday was submission and jury day. Each artist was allowed to submit two pieces of any size and medium to be judged which means that there would be a lot of paintings to compete with. I wasn’t expecting to win, but my odds were better than winning the lottery.

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Cavan Painting Festival reception at Galerie Q.

 

The awards reception was held at Gallery Q and there was a really great turn out. I was glad that a young person won the grand prize as they probably needed the money the way that I do. I didn’t place, but am still happy with what I created and know that art is very subjective. I’m not traditional in my singing or painting so although my style may not have been what the judges were looking for, there may be a buyer for my pieces somewhere out there.

The festival was a good experience, mother nature helped make it an even more memorable time, and the artists that I met were really talented. I definitely recommend checking this event out next year as I know that this year’s success will lead to an annual favourite among the locals.

 

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Collection of photos from the festival:

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